Entries in IARR (12)

Saturday
Jun282014

Relationship Science Goes Down Under

For three days in July (July 10-13th) the International Association for Relationship Research will be meeting in Melbourne, Australia! There will be speakers from many disciplines (e.g., psychology, sociology, communication, and anthropology), all of whom will be talking about the newest advances in relationship science. For example, Dr. Garth Fletcher will be talking about how love helps solve the mystery of human evolution, and Dr. Judith Feeney will discuss how our attachment styles affect how we respond to relationship conflict.  

Attending the regular conference can be pricey ($200 a day for non-members, or $640 for the entire weekend, including receptions), but the organization is pleased to announce a $10 event designed for the general public that will be held on Wednesday, July 9th from 12-1:30 pm (for those of you in or planning to be in Australia!). At this open event, Australian and international experts on relationships will answer fundamental questions such as Do our relationships early in life shape our relationships in later life? (Professor Jeffry Simpson, University of Minnesota) and What do we look for in a romantic partner? (Dr. Gery Karantza, Deakin University). These thought-provoking presentations will each be followed by a 20 minute Q & A and a light lunch. For registration information for this pre-conference event, please visit here

Tuesday
Jul172012

Responsiveness and Desire for Sex: The Goldilocks Phenomenon

Gurit Birnbaum presented research on how a partner’s responsiveness (in other words, their emotional availability and supportiveness) influences a person’s desire for sex with them during a first impression, and how this differs based on attachment style and gender.

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Tuesday
Jul172012

When Friends and Family Disapprove: Is There a “Romeo and Juliet Effect?"

I saw a fantastic symposium on what happens to people in romantic relationships when their friends and family disapprove. As Colleen Sinclair and others explained, findings from one classic study conducted in the 1970s showed that disapproval from parents can make a relationship even stronger. This finding was dubbed the “Romeo and Juliet Effect,” after Shakespeare’s star-crossed lovers whose families were hated enemies (and thus, would not approve of their relationship).

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Tuesday
Jul172012

Science Of Relationships at IARR in Chicago

Just to prove we were in Chicago (and had a good time!).

Front row: Amy Muise, Justin Lehmiller, Nicole Atkins, Samatha Joel, Jennifer Harman, Jennifer Shukusky, Sadie Leder, Lindsey Rodriguez

Back row: Bjarne Holmes, Benjamin Le, Gary Lewandowski, Tim Loving, Dylan Selterman

Not pictured, but were at the conference: Brent Mattingly, Sonia Ip, Charlotte & Patrick Markey, Jennifer Bevan, Marci Gleason, Maryhope Howland Rutherford, Paul Eastwick, & Sabrina Thai

In case you missed it, we wrote about some of our favorite research talks at that we saw at the conference here.

We especially want to thank all the conference speakers and attendees. We were honored that so many of you mentioned being fans of ScienceOfRelationships.com, and thank you for the great research that you all do to make our site possible.

Monday
Jul162012

From Bride to Blues: Examining the Prevalence of Post-Nuptial Depression

As someone who has never walked down the aisle, I have to say that Allison Scott’s presentation about the prevalence of "bridal blues" was an eye-opening experience. Not only did I learn that the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a wedding day survival guide, (as they compare planning a wedding to surviving a natural disaster), but also I learned that most women experience a post-wedding “let down.”

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Sunday
Jul152012

How Does Your Attachment Influence Your Sexual Relationships?

I saw a symposium of researchers who used attachment theory to explain differences in sexual behavior. In general, people high on attachment anxiety or avoidance (in other words, more insecure folks) have less satisfying sexual experiences.

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Saturday
Jul142012

Show Me the Money! But, Don't Expect Me to be Nice

Kathleen Vohs and colleagues presented research today about the links between interpersonal sensitivity and money. In several studies in her lab, she found that drawing people's attention to money makes them less likely to be helpful to others, less likely to be charitable, and less likely to even want to sit close to another person.

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Saturday
Jul142012

Lying About Physical Attractiveness

I attended an interesting talk yesterday by Dr. Edward Lemay and his colleagues about how people use deception in their relationships. He wanted to know what motivates people to lie when their girlfriend or boyfriend asks how they look. For example, if you don’t think they look very physically attractive, do you tell the truth?

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Saturday
Jul142012

Going Steady: How Do People Decide to Make Their Relationships Exclusive?

As someone who is fascinated by all things “decision making-y” in relationships, I was really excited to attend a symposium this morning on how people’s commitment to their relationships can change over time. One talk in particular, by Sara Blanch and colleagues, was about how people make that critical, early relationship choice to agree to be exclusive with their partners.

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Saturday
Jul142012

Sexting and Relationship Development

Today I kicked off the IARR conference and my first full day in Chicago by participating in a symposium (a collection of related presentations on the same topic) about sex in relationships. My co-presenter, Jimmie Manning from the Northern Kentucky University, talked about people’s motives for sexting with relationship partners.

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Friday
Jul132012

Top 5 Tips for Successfully Navigating Your First Conference

It’s hard to believe, but it has been over a decade since I attended my first conference as a student. Now as a professor, when my student who is presenting for the first time, asked me for some tips, I had to think back and put myself in his shoes.  I figured I’d pass along the following handful of suggestions to any readers who are attending their first conference or just curious about what an academic research conference involves.

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Thursday
Jul122012

Coming to You Live from Chicago, it’s IARR!

Greetings from The Windy City. Many of us at Science of Relationships are part of an organization known as the International Association for Relationships Research (IARR), which is a community of scholars who study relationships. Every 2 years, IARR holds a conference that unites relationship scientists worldwide (this year, we’re gathering in Chicago).

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