Entries in journal of social and personal relationships (84)

Thursday
May242018

Swiping Me Off My Feet on Tinder: Relationship Matters Podcast 69

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 69 “Swiping me off my feet: Explicating relationship initiation on Tinder”: Professor Leah E. LeFebvre of the University of Wyoming, talks about her paper which delves into how mobile dating apps like Tinder are changing how relationship initiating functions.Read the associated article here

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
May172018

Support Differences in Female Friendships: Relationship Matters Podcast 68

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 68 “Widening the Gap: Support gaps in same race versus different race female friendship dyads”: Professor Sharde Davis of the University of Connecticut, discusses her research on the differences in support in female friendships observed among friends from a similar racial background and those from differing racial backgrounds. Read the associated article here.  

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
May102018

The Cost of Support: Relationship Matters Podcast 67

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 67 “Circumnavigating the cost of support: Variations in cortisol as a function of self-efficacy and support visibility”: Dr Erin Crockett talks about her study into the visibility of support and its impact on cortisol and stress levels in people with high and low self-efficacy.Read the associated article here 

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
May032018

Changes in Compassionate Love: Relationship Matters Podcast 66

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 66 “Changes in older couples’ compassionate love over a year: The roles of gender, health, and attachment avoidance”: Dr Allen Sabey discusses his research on the changes in compassionate love in older couples over time as well the impact of health. Read the associated article here.  

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
Apr192018

Need Satisfaction and Growth in Mothers: Relationship Matters Podcast 64

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 64 “The association between basic need satisfaction in relationship and personal growth among lesbian and heterosexual mothers”: Dr Geva Shenkman discusses his fascinating research comparing the personal growth and basic needs satisfaction in relationships of heterosexual and lesbian mothers. Read the associated article here.  

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
Apr122018

Reactions to a Dominant Partner, Implications for Satisfaction: Relationship Matters Podcast 63

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 63 “Negative affective reaction to partner’s dominant behavior influences satisfaction with romantic relationship”: Dr Gentiana Sadikaj from McGill University, Montreal discusses her recent article on how dominant behaviour can cause a negative effect on the partner by and then how that can affect the relationship quality. Read the associated article here

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
Apr052018

Volatility in Daily Relationship Quality: Relationship Matters Podcast 62

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 62 “Volatility in daily relationship quality”: Ashley Cooper from Florida State University from the Utah State University discusses her recent article about how volatility in relationship quality and its attachment anxiety and attachment avoidance. Read the associated article here 

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
Mar292018

Resilience among Marginalized Family Members: Relationship Matters Podcast 61

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 61 “The communicative process of resilience for marginalized family members: Dr Elizabeth Dorrance Hall from the Utah State University discusses her recent article about her study on marginalised family members and their resilience. Read the associated article here 

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
Mar222018

External Stress and Relationship Satisfaction Does Everyone React the Same?: Relationship Matters Podcast 60

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 60 “Who suffers from stress? Action-state orientation moderates the effect of external stress on relationship satisfaction: Dr Sabine Backes from the University of Zurich discusses her recent article which explores how stress plays out in relationships; comparing the different impacts of external stress on relationships of action-orientated and state-oriented people. Read the associated article here

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

Thursday
Mar152018

Anticipating Change and Relationship Quality: Relationship Matters Podcast 59

Relationship Matters Podcast Number 59 “People they are a changin’: the links between anticipating change and romantic relationship quality”: Anika Cloutier from Queen’s University, Ontario, Canada discusses how people’s relationships change over time; and how anticipating a future where themselves and their partner either both change in a similar way, or both stay the same can enable a higher relationship quality between them. Read the associated article here.

Interested in learning more about relationships? Click here for other topics on Science of Relationships. Like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter to get our articles delivered directly to your NewsFeed. Learn more about our book and download it here.

 

Thursday
Feb222018

Cyberbullying: Sticks and Stones May Break my Bones, but Tweets are What Really Hurt Me

In September of 2017, Melania Trump gave a speech to the United Nations in which she spoke out against the harms caused by individuals who engage in cyberbullying, or  “intentional aggressive behavior that is carried out repeatedly, occurs between a perpetrator and victim who are unequal in power, and occurs through electronic technologies”.1 Few could argue with her urging of the world’s leaders to focus on this issue; the media is ripe with gut-wrenching stories of young (and old) people whose lives have been devastated by digital bullies. 

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Friday
Nov102017

Some Things You Know You Have Before They’re Gone

A wise man (with amazing hair) once crooned “don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone”. The statement’s intended interpretation is that we often take for granted the positive characteristics of our romantic partners up until the moment the relationship is lost.

But is it possible that there are some things we do know we have before we’ve lost them, and that we go out of our way to hang on tight? In a recent study published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Joshua Oltmanns, Patrick Markey, and Juliana French hypothesized just that. Specifically, they argued that people in relationships are especially in tune how their own physical attractiveness stacks up relative to their partner.1 And when an individual perceives their partner is the relatively more attractive one, they will do things, subtly and not so subtly, to keep their hotter partner all to themselves.

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Friday
Nov032017

Dating Your Boss May Be Bad For Your Career

Getting romantically involved with a coworker is not uncommon; it’s estimated that nearly 10 million workplace romances start each year, and about half of all white-collar workers have been involved in a workplace romance at some point during their careers.1 Among these workplace romances, nearly a third involve relationships between an employee and a coworker with higher status in the organization.1 Although these status differences may result in problematic power dynamics within the relationship, it’s also reasonable to assume dating one’s boss leads to more career opportunities (e.g., benefits of favoritism). At the same time, however, people with knowledge of the workplace tryst might think less favorably of those who become romantically involved with their bosses, resenting them for appearing to use that relationship to advance their careers.

Across two studies1 published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, Suzanne Chan-Serafin and her colleagues investigated the effects of subordinate-boss workplace relationships on individuals’ career development. The researchers hypothesized that those who are romantically-involved with a superior at work would receive fewer opportunities for training and promotion by third-party evaluators.

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Friday
Oct062017

Hopelessly Romantic and Easily Disappointed?

America is a country of romantics: we love our reality dating shows, rom-coms, and Disney princess movies. Romantic beliefs, like the ideas of love at first sight, “love will overcome all obstacles,” and “happily ever after“ are pervasive in our culture. Have you ever wondered whether these idealized beliefs regarding romanticism hurt relationships? The argument that they are harmful goes like this: (1) high romanticism leads to high expectations for your relationships: that you should never fight with your partner, that they will never let you down, and that you will always have amazing sex together. Sounds great, right? The problem is that with such lofty ideal standards for your relationship, (2) you’ve set yourself up to fail because these unrealistic expectations are, well, unrealistic. With such high expectations, your partner and relationship will surely let you down, and (3) this disappointment should cause you to be dissatisfied. But is this 3-step plan to dissatisfaction supported by the data?

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Friday
Sep222017

We Grow Older Together, But Lonely

Loneliness is a particularly negative psychological experience that is linked to poor physical health. Single people and those who live alone are susceptible to loneliness, as are those who have poor quality social relationships. In fact, even those who have long-term relationships, such as married people, can experience loneliness if their marriages are unfulfilling. What is it about a poor quality marriage that results in feelings of loneliness?

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Friday
Sep082017

The Relationship is a Changin’: The Benefits Achieved When Partners Change Together

There is a well-worn saying, often mistakenly attributed to Albert Einstein, suggesting “women marry men hoping they will change. Men marry women hoping they will not.”1 This statement may or may not be true, but highlights an interesting (and understudied) relationship dynamic: Change plays an important role in relationships. It is natural to wonder how long your relationship will last, whether you will fall out of love, whether you’ll have children and what they’ll be like, how your partner will be as a parent, whether you’ll get a divorce, etc. The common denominator in each of these inquiries is that you and your partner will experience your fair share of change along the way. But is this change good?

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Thursday
Jan052017

Making Sense of a Breakup

The way people tell stories about their relationships says a lot about them and their relationships. For example, the pronouns that people use when telling their stories can reveal their relationship’s stability: People who are more committed tend to talk about “us,” whereas people who are less committed tend to talk about “me” (see here for more).1 People who write about important events in their relationships and end the story positively (e.g., “We went through a rough patch, but now we’re stronger than ever!”) have better mental health, less depression, greater relationship satisfaction, feel closer to their partners, and are less likely to experience a breakup within 1 year than people who end their story negatively (e.g., “We went through a rough patch and things are still a bit shaky”).

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Thursday
Oct062016

Safe Sex, Lies, and Past Partners

There are a lot of safe-sex behaviors that reduce sexually transmitted infections (e.g., consistent condom use, getting tested for STIs). In addition, open communication with your partner(s) about your respective sexual histories can help you assess the risk of a new (or established) sexual partner. Unfortunately, however, a recent a study of 183 college students published in the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships suggests that the majority of young adults may be dishonest when disclosing their sexual histories to sexual partners. Specifically, over 60% of respondents admitted to previously lying at least once when talking to a current partner about their number of past sexual partners, and 20% reported that they always lie about their number of previous partners. Those students who had previously lied about their sexual history were generally uncomfortable with talking about safe sex. So while open and honest communication is important in sexual relationships, you can’t assume you partner is telling you the truth.

tl;dr: Your new partner probably may not be completely honest, so using a condom is always a good idea.

Horan, S. M. (2016). Further understanding sexual communication: Honesty, deception, safety, and risk. Journal of Social and Personal Relationships, 33, 449-468.

Tuesday
Sep132016

Single and (Not?) Lonely: How Socially Connected are Married versus Single People?

When it comes to building communities of interconnected friends and family, how does marital status influence the links between people? Who interacts more with their neighbors, friends, and family-- married people or their single counterparts?

Singles are often stereotyped as lonely, sitting at home by themselves (or maybe with a few cats). In contrast, marriage is often thought of as the foundation of our communities, functioning as a sort of social glue. However, for married people, husbands or wives may have to balance giving time to their partners at the expense of spending time with other social connections. Singles, on the other hand, have time to socialize with their friends and families, and therefore may be more connected. So, which is it? 

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Tuesday
Sep062016

Relationship Work: When You Have Relationship Problems, Who Should You Talk To?  

Imagine your relationship isn’t going well and you need to talk about it with someone. You start the conversation by saying something along the lines of, “Things aren’t going well in our relationship. We seem to be in this rough patch where I don’t feel like we’re connecting the way we used to.”  The question is, who would you be most likely to say this to -- your relationship partner or your best friend?

The fact is that every relationship has problems (e.g., who is responsible for vacuuming, dealing with in-laws, the growing malaise consuming your relationship, etc.). When things hit a rough patch, talking it over may help. When you discuss your relationship problems or challenges with others (typically your own partner or your best friend), researchers call this “relationship work.”1 A recent study from the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships explored the nature of relationship work and how such work may help shape a relationship’s long-term quality and stability.

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