Entries in podcast (48)

Wednesday
Jun082016

On Our Podcast Playlist: New Episodes of Relationship Matters

It's been a while since we've checked in with Relationship Matters, the official podcast of the Journal of Social and Personal Relationships. They've released a bunch of awesome new episodes over the last couple of months. Check them out!

  • Episode #56 - Physiology and pillow talk: Amanda Denes (University of Connecticut) talks about the association between individual differences in testosterone and communication after sexual activity. Read the associated article here.
Friday
Oct302015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Danielle Sulikowski on Head Tilt and Allure

Does tilting your noggin like a bobble-head doll make you more or less alluring?Robert Burriss talks to Danielle Sulikowski.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Friday
Oct162015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Casey Klofstad on Voice Pitch and Politics

How do voices and faces win votes? Robert Burriss talks to Casey Klofstad about his new research into voice pitch and the effect it has on perceptions of a political candidate's age, strength, and competence. We'll also look at how other nonverbal cues, including facial appearance, influence election success.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Saturday
Oct032015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Samantha Leivers on Detecting Infidelity

Can men detect if a woman is a cheater? Robert Burriss talks to Samantha Leivers of the University of Western Australia about her new research on appearance and faithfulness.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Friday
Sep182015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Red or Dead

In this episode Robert Burriss investigates the allure of violent video games, and how they relate to sex. Also, does the colour red increase a man's attractiveness?

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Sunday
Sep062015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Men Produce More Semen When They View More Porn Stars

Is more more, or is more less? We look at two very different experiments about quantity, quality, and sex. How does the type and amount of porn a man views influence how much semen he produces? And do women from around the world prefer a taller or a shorter man? In this episode Robert Burriss tackles these questions and more.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Friday
Aug142015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Marriage or Fling? Desiring Different Partners for Different Relationships

If you’re single (and even if you’re not) are you on the look-out for someone to marry, a one night stand, or something in between? In this episode Robert Burriss explores how the type of relationship we seek can influence our mating behaviour and psychology.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Sunday
Aug022015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Same-Sex and Both-Sex Attraction in Adolescence

With gay marriage now legal in the USA (not to mention, Sweden, New Zealand, Uruguay, and the Pitcairn Islands), Robert Burriss looks at how same-sex attraction develops during adolescence. Is same-sex attraction stable during teenage years, and what are lesbians’ first memories of same-sex attraction?

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Sunday
Jul192015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - When We Think We're More Attractive Than We Are

Many of us wish we were more confident, but is self-assuredness or arrogance attractive? Is it possible to be overconfident when it comes to love? And is there a male propensity to overestimate how attractive we are to women? Robert Burriss discusses these topics and more.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Tuesday
Jul072015

Catching Up with The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast

We're a bit behind on our podcast listening and there are three new episodes of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast by Robert Burriss available for your listening pleasure:

  • Male rivalry: sex, money, and morality. We find out how our rational minds go all screwy when we're faced with attractive rivals or sexual competitors. Three new experiments show how sexual rivalry primes men to be cruel, self-centred, and prone to risk.
  • Pregnancy and desire, and are bigger breasts better? We know that pregnant women get cravings for unusual foods, but does pregnancy also affect what women desire in a man? We also look at a new experiment that shows once and for all whether men prefer larger or smaller breasts. You'll be surprised by the results!
  • Skin colour and the menstrual cycle. Swollen bums and flushed faces: We know that chimpanzees and other primates advertise their fertility with conspicuous physical transformations, but what about humans?

Check out all the available episodes of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Thursday
May212015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Beer Goggles and Penis Arrows

Robert Burriss straps on beer goggles to find out how alcohol influences attractiveness. Also, you have a penis! Well, half of you do, and we discover what happens to men’s sexual thoughts when they’re reminded of what they’re packing in their tighty whities.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Tuesday
May052015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Is Beauty Contagious?

Robert Burriss discusses how the average attractiveness of a group of people is influenced by its members. Also, how the ratio of men to women in our social group meddles with our mating psychology.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Wednesday
Apr222015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - How Parents Meddle in Their Children's Love Lives

Meet the parents! Robert Burriss discusses two new experiments show how choosing a partner can send shockwaves across the generations. Find out how parents meddle in their children’s love lives, and how sexy sons lead to handsome fathers.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Thursday
Apr162015

Negative Consequences of Emotional Suppression: Relationship Matters Podcast 46

In SAGE’s newest edition of the Relationship Matters podcast, hosted by Dr. Bjarne Holmes of Champlain College, Dr. Stephania Balzarotti (Catholic University of the Sacred Heart, Italy) discusses the consequences associated with frequently holding back, or suppressing, communication of emotions within marriage. 

The work, carried out with Patrizia Velotti (University Genoa, Italy), Semira Tagliabue (Catholic University), Giulio Zavattini (University of Rome, Italy), and Tammy English and James Gross (both of Stanford University), tracked 299 newlywed couples for two years, once in the first 6 months of their marriages and then again about 18 months later. The couple members independently provided information about how often they withhold expressing their emotions from their partners and indicated how satisfied they were in their marriage.

Click to read more ...

Wednesday
Apr082015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - Preventing Cheating with "Coalitional Mate Retention"

With a little help from my friends: Robert Burriss discusses two new experiments that examine how people use coalitional mate retention tactics to prevent their partners from cheating. Your friends can help to keep your partner faithful.

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Tuesday
Mar312015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast - New Episode on Facial Contrast and Kim Kardashian's Lower Back

Why do women wear make up? Robert Burriss interviews Alex Jones of Gettysburg College in Pennsylvania about his new research into cosmetics and 'facial contrast'. Also, how did Kim Kardashian break the Internet? Was it her massive bum, or the pronounced curvature of her lower back?

Check out the newest episode of The Psychology of Attractiveness podcast here.

Thursday
Mar262015

Relational Savoring in Long Distance Relationships: Relationship Matters 45

Anyone that’s been in a long distance relationship knows how hard it can be to be geographically separated from somebody they care about. SAGE has released a new edition of the Relationship Matters podcast (hosted by Dr. Bjarne Holmes of Champlain College) in which Dr. Jessica Borelli (Pomona College) was interviewed regarding her research on strategies for successfully manage long distance relationships (the research team also included Hanna Rasmussen also of Pomona College, Margaret Burkhart of Claremont Graduate University, and David Sbarra of the University of Arizona).

The researchers randomly assigned 533 people in long-distance relationships (i.e., separated by at least 100 miles) to either a relational savoring condition or one of two control conditions. All participants, regardless of condition, first engaged in a laboratory task that is capable of putting stress on long distance relationships. In the relational savoring condition, participants were asked to recall and concentrate on a specific past moment during which they felt very positive about the relationship or particularly safe and loved.

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Wednesday
Mar182015

The Psychology of Attractiveness Podcast

We want to take a moment to turn you on to an awesome podcast produced by our colleague and fellow ScienceOfRelationships.com contributor, Dr. Robert Burriss. Rob is a research fellow at Northumbria University in Newcastle, UK, and we love his podcast, which is filled with sharp humor, tie-ins to current events, and most importantly, excellent sexy science. We'll be featuring new episodes when they are released, and you can check out some of the recent episodes below: 

If prefer to read rather than listen, transcripts are available here. 

Check out Rob's ScienceOfRelationships.com articles here.

Thursday
Jan222015

Stress and Resolving Disagreements Immediately: Relationship Matters Podcast 42

In this first installment of the Winter/Spring 2015 season of SAGE's “Relationship Matters” podcast, hosted by Dr. Bjarne Holmes of Champlain College), Dr. Kira Birditt (University of Michigan) discusses how resolving disagreements (or not) affects individuals’ daily stress hormone production.

Briefly, cortisol -- popularly referred to as the “stress hormone” -- helps regulate our daily sleep-wake cycles and also helps us react appropriately to stressful situations. When the cortisol system is functioning optimally, the hormone peaks about thirty minutes after waking time (to help us become alert for the day) and then generally falls throughout the day, culminating at its lowest point before bedtime. Chronically elevated daily levels of cortisol are generally associated with negative health outcomes. 

Click to read more ...

Thursday
Dec182014

Moral Boundaries in Relationships: Relationship Matters Podcast 41

Consider the following (probably fictional) scenario, described in detail by pop culture writer Chuck Klosterman1 and paraphrased here: Jack and Jane are in a happy romantic relationship for 2 years. One day Jack receives an invitation from another woman living in his building to watch her masturbate in her apartment (with absolutely no physical contact and no emotional intimacy). Intrigued, he goes to her apartment to watch her masturbate, then returns to his room and goes to sleep. Jack believes this episode to be weird/strange, but not unethical. He innocently mentions it to Jane, who upon hearing this, becomes extremely upset and ends the relationship, cutting off all contact with Jack. 

What do you think about this situation? Did Jack do anything unethical? Is accepting an invitation to watch someone masturbate (while in a relationship with someone else) a moral violation?

Click to read more ...